Claim Charts Continue to Be a Problem

In Ford Motor Company v. Cuozzo Speed Technologies, Inc., IPR2014-01393, Paper 3 (August 28, 2014), the Board granted the petition a filing date, but required petitioner to correct its claim chart in five days, noting:

Claim charts should only be used to provide an element-by-element showing as to how the prior art teaches the limitations of a claim (e.g., citations to a prior art reference, quotations from a prior art reference). Claim charts may not include arguments, claim construction, statements of the law, or detailed explanations as to why a claim limitation is taught or rendered obvious by the prior art. A mere citation to an expert declaration (e.g., “See Ex. 1015 ¶ 29”) in a claim chart is permissible, but anything more than a mere citation is improper.

 

This entry was posted in Inter Partes Review by Bryan Wheelock. Bookmark the permalink.

About Bryan Wheelock

Education
J.D., Washington University in St. Louis
B.S.E. in Mechanical Engineering, Duke University

Bryan Wheelock’s practice includes preparation and prosecution of patent and trademark applications and drafting of intellectual property agreements, including non-compete agreements. He has brought and defended lawsuits in federal and state courts relating to intellectual property and has participated in seizures of counterfeit and infringing goods.

Bryan prepares and prosecutes U.S. and foreign patent applications for medical devices, mechanical and electromechanical devices, manufacturing machinery and processes, metal alloys and other materials. He also does a substantial amount of patentability searching, trademark availability searching and patent and trademark infringement studies.

In addition to his practice at Harness Dickey, Bryan is an Adjunct Professor at Washington University School of Law and Washington University School of Engineering.